#Coronavirus

It seems parents are more afraid of having their kids stuck at home with them 24/7 for the next few weeks than they are of the actual pandemic. Not only is there no school, but we’ve also been asked to practice “social distancing” (no playdates, outings, parks, public places, etc.), which is making you wonder if you will end up killing your kids before the coronavirus even gets a chance to come near them…

We’re here to help.

Permission to Parent: The Mindful Parenting Conundrum

Mindful parenting is a buzzword that has been gaining a lot of traction in recent years, and with good reason. There are many benefits, but as with any parenting trend, a completely mindful approach, won’t work for everyone.

Simply put, being mindful (whether it pertains to eating, parenting or life) means learning to slow down and becoming aware of your thoughts and feelings, so that you can be present in the current moment/situation.

As parents, we all long for our children to be happy, well-adjusted kids. But happiness is something so fleeting and circumstantial. Joy is the emotional homeostasis we are truly trying to achieve. When your child has joy, they don’t sweat the small stuff so much. They are able to weather the storms of life and grow from their failures. Happiness is purely dependent on external factors, which tend to fluctuate up and down through various seasons in our lives. Joy, on the other hand, brings resilience, hope and optimism.

So how do we help our children to find real joy? Here are 7 steps that parents can work on to help their children get there:

Imagine you came to a traffic light that flickered red-orange-green-red-orange-green. You’d probably be confused (Should I go or stop!?), and possibly anxious (What if I crash? I may be stuck here forever!). 

The same process is likely to happen to our children if they receive mixed signals from their primary caretakers. Just like the faulty robot in the example leaves it up to you to decide when it’s safe to go, your child will also need to figure it out on her own. And “crashing” may be the result. 

All of us hate red lights (Just my luck!), but there’s nothing like the stress caused by a broken robot to make us appreciate a light turning red when it needs to. There’s safety in this mechanism. Likewise, there’s protection in receiving clear-cut messages at home – even if it’s “no!”

“Grandparents” and “grandchildren” are two well-coined terms, as few relationships in life are so “grand” than the one between these two parties. However, for the parents sandwiched in the middle, this connection can sometimes pose “grand” challenges that may even result in conflict between the senior and junior adults.

Yet, if everyone involved is respectful, willing to compromise and able to focus on the privileges of the situation, the grandparent-grandchild bond could greatly enrich all three generations. To help with this, consider following the ABC for grandparents and parents below.

Second-time mom

Congratulations on your second pregnancy!

Wondering what lies ahead – besides a couple of extra stretch marks, additional lost sleep and, of course, the cutest, new baby? Here are some things I’ve learned that might help you prepare yourself and your family for Number Two.

A modern teen and a screen go hand in hand (quite literally, if you consider how their smart phones are glued to their palms). While this phenomenon is a natural product of the digital age, it is also very unnatural on many levels.

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