Imagine you came to a traffic light that flickered red-orange-green-red-orange-green. You’d probably be confused (Should I go or stop!?), and possibly anxious (What if I crash? I may be stuck here forever!). 

The same process is likely to happen to our children if they receive mixed signals from their primary caretakers. Just like the faulty robot in the example leaves it up to you to decide when it’s safe to go, your child will also need to figure it out on her own. And “crashing” may be the result. 

All of us hate red lights (Just my luck!), but there’s nothing like the stress caused by a broken robot to make us appreciate a light turning red when it needs to. There’s safety in this mechanism. Likewise, there’s protection in receiving clear-cut messages at home – even if it’s “no!”

The new school year comes with many stresses for parents (especially the newbies): lunchboxes to pack, school fees to pay, carpools to organise, school uniforms to launder, homework to help with…. and on top of that extra-curricular activities to choose and manage.

The latter troubles many parents due to the pressure these ventures place on our time, finances and sometimes even on the relationship with our children. We may ask, “What is enough or too much? Which activities are essential?”, and this uncertainty only adds to the tension.

Maybe we could simplify the matter. Let’s start by asking why we let our children participate in such activities in the first place?

“Grandparents” and “grandchildren” are two well-coined terms, as few relationships in life are so “grand” than the one between these two parties. However, for the parents sandwiched in the middle, this connection can sometimes pose “grand” challenges that may even result in conflict between the senior and junior adults.

Yet, if everyone involved is respectful, willing to compromise and able to focus on the privileges of the situation, the grandparent-grandchild bond could greatly enrich all three generations. To help with this, consider following the ABC for grandparents and parents below.

Premature

Having a premature baby is not something most mothers expect when they are expecting.

In most cases, there is not merely a premature baby struggling to survive, but also “premature” parents who feel unprepared for the sudden and overwhelming challenges of having a baby – and a highly fragile one needing specialised care.

I have spoken to several mothers who had prems. Following is a summary of their stories of bravery amid the ordeal.

“My kids drive me crazy!”

This is something most of us have said or thought at some point while feeling overwhelmed by the demands of parenting. Yet, many mothers stare more severe psychological problems (particularly postpartum depression) in the face and will need professional help to overcome this obstacle. 

As mothers, we should all invest in our mental wellbeing by caring not only for everyone in our family but for ourselves too. In the spirit of Mental Health Awareness Month, let us consider various wellbeing protective mechanisms we should all try to build into our lives.

Second-time mom

Congratulations on your second pregnancy!

Wondering what lies ahead – besides a couple of extra stretch marks, additional lost sleep and, of course, the cutest, new baby? Here are some things I’ve learned that might help you prepare yourself and your family for Number Two.

Is your marriage taking a back-seat?

Marriage is the bedrock of the family. If this foundation is crumbling, so will the entire household that is built upon it. As busy and exhausted parents, we often tend to prioritise our children when it comes to our time, energy, resources and emotional capacity. While giving your best to your kids is surely important to their optimal development, we should never forget that “the best” includes having them grow up in a stable home with the example of a flourishing marital relationship. Prioritising your children and prioritising your marriage are therefore not competing interests, but two sides of the same coin.

Yet, we understand that with small, really needy children in the home it is not easy to keep the romantic fires burning. Marital sacrifices (like drastically reduced alone time) are inevitable. However, these restrictions could luckily be mitigated by the mutual joys and suffering created by co-parenting – provided that you keep connected during this season.

Home is where the ‘hearth’ is

Global temperatures are on the rise and when it comes to raising nature-loving children, the home is always the best place to start. The first and most important step in cultivating ‘greener’ habits at home is to practise what you preach. Luckily you don’t have to be an experienced ‘greenie’ to do this. Yes, being kind on nature can be as simple as being mindful of the products that you buy and showing your children how to appreciate the natural world around them.

Being a mother is a beautiful, but often bizarre experience that could at times defy reason. On Planet Parenthood a number of phenomena do not work according to conventional logic. Can you relate to these…?

1. Maths doesn’t add up for mothers.

You spend 80% of your time cleaning and tidying, but your home remains 100% messy.

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